Photo by Evan P. Cordes

Photo by Evan P. Cordes

Renowned author Stephen King, who has published 49 novels that have sold over 350 million copies, writes at least ten pages each day. As a creative person, you’ve experienced writer’s block, even if you’re not necessarily a writer; software engineers, artists, or anyone that has to create things for a living is susceptible. We also all know the well-worn advice of practicing even for just a little bit, at least once a day — but how does one actually stick to it?

Product Manager at Twitter, Buster Benson, recently created 750words.com to help us break through writer’s block and open up our creative passages. He uses a rewards system to keep on track (much like the famous Jerry Seinfeld calendar-method). The idea is simple:

Every month you get a clean bowling-esque score card. If you write anything at all, you get 1 point. If you write 750 words or more, you get 2 points. If you write two, three or more days in a row, you get even more points. How I see it, points can motivate. It’s fun to try to stay on streaks and the points are a way to play around with that. You can also see how others are doing points-wise if you’re at all competitive that way.

Benson shares his inspiration:

I’ve long been inspired by an idea I first learned about in The Artist’s Way called morning pages. Morning pages are three pages of writing done every day, typically encouraged to be in “long hand”, typically done in the morning, that can be about anything and everything that comes into your head. It’s about getting it all out of your head, and is not supposed to be edited or censored in any way.

The idea is that if you can get in the habit of writing three pages a day, that it will help clear your mind and get the ideas flowing for the rest of the day. Unlike many of the other exercises in that book, I found that this one actually worked and was really really useful.

By writing 750 words a day, or 50 lines of code, or drawing a page of illustrations every morning, you’re turning the act of creating into a habit. A creative block isn’t worn down by worrying or procrastinating; it can only be broken by trying.

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  • Rukari Asheber

    Morning writing is the way to go. Even if you can cant write concise ideas, just keep writing to get word count. I’ve noticed that I write “jargon” for long enough I’ll begin to push through to more constructive and creative ideas that flow more consistently. Good article!

  • http://www.ronnthwaites.com/blog/ Ronn Thwaites

    Interesting idea; thanks for sharing. I agree that getting into the routine of writing everyday is a great way of pushing through blocks that can kick in from time to time. The very process of just writing to get that word count fires up the creative ideas

  • Fatinah

    Would that apply to journal writing every day ?

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