Motion designed by Nick Abrams from the Noun Project.

Motion designed by Nick Abrams from the Noun Project.

When dealing with clients and working with teams, it’s not uncommon to hear the phrase “get the ball rolling” when describing project progress. But are the phone calls, emails and scheduling of meetings actually considered work? A costly mistake for many is confusing the idea of being in motion with simply taking action. Our real job, the action, should be to produce the actual deliverable. While motion and action might sound similar, they’re not the same. In a recent blog post, entrepreneur and travel photographer James Clear distinguished the two as follows:

Motion is when you’re busy doing something, but that task will never produce an outcome by itself. Action, on the other hand, is the type of behavior that will get you a result.

There are many strategies for taking action, but two that have worked for Clear are:

1. Set a schedule for your actions.
2. Pick a date to shift you from motion to action.

Being in motion is not only an inevitable part of getting things done, it’s integral. But we can’t get lost in it. Clear offers a simple way to refocus by asking: “Are you doing something? Or are you just preparing to do it? Are you in motion? Or are you taking action?” Don’t get caught up measuring progress by steps you’ve completed. In the words of ten-time NCAA National Championship winning coach John Wooden, “Never mistake activity for achievement.” Instead, be relentlessly focused on the end-goal. Motion will never produce a final result. Action will. Read the rest of Clear’s blog on motion vs. action here.

  • http://www.newcenturycil.org/?p=707 Friday Link Round Up

    […] Are You In Motion or Are You Taking Action?–Advice on making sure you’re focusing on the actions that lead to outcomes. […]

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/daily-clippings/p/4019894540/2014/04/18/are-you-in-motion-or-are-you-taking-action Are You in Motion or Are You Taking Action? | D...

    […] Are you doing something? Or are you just preparing to do it?  […]

  • mmscomment

    This is actually Ben Franklin who said, “Never confuse motion with action.”

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