Designed by Mauro Lucchesi for the Noun Project

Designed by Mauro Lucchesi for the Noun Project

We typically think of “burnout” as the result of working too many hard, stressful hours. However, new research shows that burnouts actually come in three different types, and each requires a different strategy to fix.

1. Overload:

The frenetic employee who works toward success until exhaustion, is most closely related to emotional venting. These individuals might try to cope with their stress by complaining about the organizational hierarchy at work, feeling as though it imposes limits on their goals and ambitions. That coping strategy, unsurprisingly, seems to lead to a stress overload and a tendency to throw in the towel.

2. Lack of Development:

Most closely associated with an avoidance coping strategy. These under-challenged workers tend to manage stress by distancing themselves from work, a strategy that leads to depersonalization and cynicism — a harbinger for burning out and packing up shop.

3. Neglect:

Seems to stem from a coping strategy based on giving up in the face of stress. Even though these individuals want to achieve a certain goal, they lack the motivation to plow through barriers to get to it.

Knowing the signs of each type (e.g. a coworker talking badly about their boss, becoming aloof, missing deadlines, etc.) is key to recognizing, and thus being able to fix, the problem as a whole.

Read the rest of the article at Psychological Science.

  • Peter Parker

    “Most closely associated with an avoidance coping strategy. These
    under-challenged workers tend to manage stress by distancing themselves
    from work, a strategy that leads to depersonalization and cynicism — a
    harbinger for burning out and packing up shop.”

    Damn.. time for an another job..

  • http://bitly.com/1hsbtUG Mary W. Crow

    Very helpful read!

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