HiRes

Todd Henry keeps himself busy between publishing books, speaking at conferences, consulting, and managing a business. Yet he still manages to get it all done. He recently shared one of his hacks for how he manages it all: end each day with the beginning of tomorrow in mind. Todd writes:

Here’s a two-minute strategy for lessening procrastination and creative block by ending with the beginning in mind:

1. Before you close out your work for the day, capture any open questions that you are currently working on. If you were to continue working right now, what would be the very next thing you would do?

2. Write those questions and the next thing you would do on a post-it, or a sheet of paper, and leave it where you’ll see it the next day.

3. Determine right then what you’ll do first when you next sit down at your workstation. Establish a starting point for your work. This will give you immediate traction.

Following this approach will help you save time and — more importantly — avoid stressful headaches. Start tonight by spending a few minutes writing down your starting point for tomorrow. Then be sure to read Todd’s full write-up over on the Accidental Creative blog.

Related: You can see Todd speak in person at the 2014 99u conference.

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/daily-clippings/p/4016178780/2014/02/18/end-every-day-with-a-beginning End Every Day With a Beginning | Daily Clipping...

    […] Pro end-of-day tip: write what you want to do the next day on a post-it.  […]

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/creative-writing-inspiration/p/4016190761/2014/02/18/end-every-day-with-a-beginning End Every Day With a Beginning | Creative Writi...

    […] Here’s a two-minute strategy for lessening procrastination and creative block by ending with the beginning in mind:1. Before you close out your work for the day, capture any open questions that you are currently working on. If you were to continue working right now, what would be the very next thing you would do?2. Write those questions and the next thing you would do on a post-it, or a sheet of paper, and leave it where you’ll see it the next day.3. Determine right then what you’ll do first when you next sit down at your workstation. Establish a starting point for your work. This will give you immediate traction.  […]

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/creative-me/p/4016214018/2014/02/19/end-every-day-with-a-beginning End Every Day With a Beginning | Creative_me | ...

    […] Here’s a two-minute strategy for lessening procrastination and creative block by ending with the beginning in mind:1. Before you close out your work for the day, capture any open questions that you are currently working on. If you were to continue working right now, what would be the very next thing you would do?2. Write those questions and the next thing you would do on a post-it, or a sheet of paper, and leave it where you’ll see it the next day.3. Determine right then what you’ll do first when you next sit down at your workstation. Establish a starting point for your work. This will give you immediate traction.  […]

  • https://www.behance.net/JakobFlorio Jakob Florio

    This is a nice, small article. I like the idea of ending a long day with the missions of the next day. It creates a little more time at the end of the day, but prevents trouble the next morning. Nice article!

    • http://www.creativesomething.net/ tannerc

      Thanks Jakob!

  • Kate Bish

    Side benefit of this activity – once you’ve written it down, you can release it from your brain for the night – leave work at work!

    • http://www.creativesomething.net/ tannerc

      Excellent insight Kate. I completely agree, this saves you the headache/stress of having to worry about what you’ll tackle tomorrow at work. That relief can make your home life that much better (hopefully).

  • http://techbait.net/finish-each-day-by-making-your-plan-for-the-next-one/ Finish Each Day by Making Your Plan For the Next One | Techbait Tech News

    […] End With The Beginning In Mind | Accidental Creative via 99u […]

  • http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2014/02/finish-each-day-by-making-your-plan-for-the-next-one/ Finish Each Day By Making Your Plan For The Next One | Lifehacker Australia

    […] End With The Beginning In Mind [Accidental Creative via 99u] […]

  • Guest

    I am a big support of lists and planning. When I leave any project, be it for work, art, or around the house, I like having a checklist of things to do. And if I’m not finished, I like making a list of things that still need to be done and questions I have. It does the body no good to keep mental lists and worry about tasks you are not currently able to work on. The brain needs a break!

  • http://www.spacediscjockey.com Joe Wojciechowski

    I am a big supporter of lists and planning. When I leave any project, be it for work, art, or around the house, I like having a checklist of things to do. And if I’m not finished, I like making a list of things that still need to be done and questions I have. It does the body no good to keep mental lists and worry about tasks you are not currently able to work on. The brain needs a break!

  • Paige Dearing

    Take one step further and block out time for it on your iCal, either for tomorrow or later in the week. It gives me piece of mind that I won’t forget a crucial task (or lose the post-it) if I’m unable to tackle it first thing the next day.

    • http://www.creativesomething.net/ tannerc

      Great advice Paige! Thanks for reading and commenting.

  • http://www.newcenturycil.org/?p=674 Friday Link Round Up

    […] End Every Day with a Beginning–Some good advice on ending the day in a way that helps you hit the ground running tomorrow. […]

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/disruptive-thinker/p/4016421448/2014/02/22/end-every-day-with-a-beginning End Every Day With a Beginning | Disruptive Thi...

    […] Pro end-of-day tip: write what you want to do the next day on a post-it.  […]

  • http://www.wearemiller.com/ Yael Miller

    Great advice. I’d suggest taking it a step further (for easily distracted types), who are likely to get sidelined by the usual suspects: email and web. Close out of your email and web browser the day before so you don’t start your day with the habitual email check. Print out any relevant emails if you’re going to need to refer to them the following AM. This should help you focus on getting right down to business as soon as your bottom hits the chair.

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/information-coping-skills/p/4016552655/2014/02/24/end-every-day-with-a-beginning End Every Day With a Beginning | Information Co...

    […] Pro end-of-day tip: write what you want to do the next day on a post-it.  […]

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/personal-effectiveness-by-carlos-escobar/p/4016964561/2014/03/03/end-every-day-with-a-beginning End Every Day With a Beginning | Personal Effec...

    […] Pro end-of-day tip: write what you want to do the next day on a post-it.  […]

  • http://cescobar78.com/2014/03/03/5-reads-on-personal-effectiveness/ 5 Reads on Personal Effectiveness | Carlos Escobar

    […] End Every Day With A Beginning.  […]

  • http://world-fun.com/?p=4317 Six Methods for Nonprofits to Avoid Procrastination | World Fun

    […] 6. End Every Day With A Beginning: Very useful technique. At the end of your take, take 5 minutes to review what you’ve done and identify the next day’s priorities. Why this method works is described here. […]

  • http://buzzingtribe.com/six-methods-for-nonprofits-to-avoid.html The best of the web | Six Methods for Nonprofits to Avoid…

    […] 6. End Every Day With A Beginning: Very useful technique. At the end of your take, take 5 minutes to review what you’ve done and identify the next day’s priorities. Why this method works is described here. […]

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