Antenna Design: Why Two Minds Think Faster Than One

About this presentation

Husband-and-wife team Masamichi Udagawa and Sigi Moeslinger have thrived as creative partners, designing everything from New York subway cars to a Knoll furniture line. Scott Belsky (Behance) and Josh Rubin (Cool Hunting) chat with the duo about what makes for a great partner and the advantages of teaming up
– for instance: faster thinking, productive friction, and more creative firepower.

About Antenna Design

Masamichi Udagawa and Sigi Moeslinger co-founded Antenna Design New York Inc. in 1997. Antenna’s design projects range from public and commercial to experimental and artistic, typically spanning object, interface, and environment.

Among their best known projects are the design of the New York City subway cars and ticket vending machines and the Bloomberg displays. In 2006, Antenna received the United States Artists Target Fellowship in the Architecture and Design Category. In 2008, Antenna won the National Design Award in Product Design.



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  • Andres Leon

    First, to find a partner, i think it’s imperative to develop a great board of networking. Not only meet as many people you can but always try to develop these relationships in different aspects. I think it’s dangerous to work with a complete stranger, even if it’s recommended or a professional in the area, because both parts most definetly complement each other in attitude, aptitudes, potentialm open-mindness and personalities.

    When you learn to explore, recognize and categorize different aspects of people you must be close to finding a good partner. I think there is no perfect partnership because in the first place they both complement with different characteristics (also with similar). Perfect partnership doesn’t only mean being successful in what they do but in the actions, attitudes & reactios they take together in different situations.

    For me the best candidate i’d feel comfortable to work with could be someone with:

    1.Ability to put inside a box his/her whole experience in the area, or technical knowledge and hide it for moments.
    2. Capability to asume a different position even if it’s contradictory to his/her opinions.
    3.The ability to belive that theres always a different way.

    I just covered 1% of the whole subject.

  • milo

    Great video. And I totally agree with Andres comments below. I started out on my own, I never really felt I was working as a real and proper business until I teamed up with my partner. The both of us have different skillsets, she is the copywriter, I am the designer. Together it just works, and the fact that I then had someone to bounce ideas off, get their criticism and input meant so much for each new project!

  • Andres Leon

    Precisely! Also, something Milo said that i thought is quiet important is:

    “and the fact that I then had someone to bounce ideas off, get their criticism and input meant so much for each new project!”

    No matter what you do, you need to learn to control criticism and feedback from anyone. If you learn to work on that it’s like .. getting “the free daily updates” in twitter by 99 percent. You get a free opportunity to get better at something. However, if you are on your own, no matter how great is your method of absortion of criticism or your ability to transform destructive criticsm into great feedback…theres a huge different between getting the same critic from a stranger and a partner. Thats a huge plus you get in having a partner: mutual positive progress.

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  • USA web developer

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  • Eltbrown

    Their married right? So their more than just partners they are one. Its more difficult to find a partnership with a stranger appose to someone you known for years. I would like to know their biography to determine their relationship more.

  • Lisa

    My partner is my husband and I really agree with the comment about not agreeing all the time. I don’t need an echo coming from my partner – I need feedback!

    We have been collaborating in one way or another since we were design students together (15 years ago) and working together has come naturally (at least for the most part). We have a short hand now that allows us to discuss, agree or disagree and move on to the next phase or idea. I started the business solo and I feel MUCH more empowered now that he is on board fully as my partner.

  • Guest

    So true. It’s better to work alone than to have a bad partner. It might even be better to work alone than to have a mediocre partner, I’m not sure. Two minds are better than one, but almost never twice as good (great partners are the exception). So you lose something when taking on a less than stellar partner, you get half the rewards but somewhere between half and 100% of the work.

  • Roger Rhodes

    I like this site
    Sounds great and very helpful Roger Rhodes

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