Ilustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco

The Surfer's Guide to Taking Risks

Life is like the ocean: sometimes it’s stormy, choppy, and a complete mess. Other times it’s calm and perfect. In the ocean, risk and opportunity go hand-in-hand. The more waves you go for, the more you’ll catch. Every day in the water and every wave presents a new opportunity.

As a surfer, every time I get in the water it’s a risk, every time I paddle for a wave it’s a risk, and every time I catch wave it’s a risk. Surfing is completely unpredictable, which keeps me constantly coming back for more. But there’s a strong correlation between your success and your tolerance for risks in both the ocean and life – and both require the same approach and process:

1. Get In the water

As you stand on the shore suiting up, you can watch other surfers catch wave after wave, in anticipation of the perfect ride. But you’re not going to catch any waves unless you’re in the water.

The more waves you go for, the more you’ll catch.

The game of life is quite similar. It’s exciting to watch people start companies, push their limits, and experience new things. But living vicariously through other people just means you’ll be standing on the shore watching others catch waves your entire life.

2. Understand and accept the fear

When you initially get in the water on a bigger-than-average surf day, the excitement you felt on shore dissipates and turns into fear. Mother Nature shows her temperamental side and you’ll often find yourself submerged, waiting for that moment when you’ll be able to come up for air. Every surfer strives to align themselves perfectly for the “take off point” of a wave, but in order to get there you have to get past the rough whitewater.With any risk, once the excitement of a new opportunity passes, fear sets in. What if you fail when you start your new company, attempt to write a book, or catch your wave? Like the whitewater, you will face obstacles that seem like they’re there to keep you from getting to your goal. But you have to realize they’re just a part of taking risks.

3. Go for it 

Waves are completely unpredictable, which makes surfing thrilling and terrifying at the same time. As each wave rolls in and you contemplate going for it, you’ll have an initial tinge of doubt. The only way to know if you’ll make it is to go for it. The author Jamail Yogis:

The take-off is arguably the most scary and difficult part of riding a wave. Too far forward or back can be the difference between a smooth glide down the face [of the wave] or being pitched—what surfers call “going over the falls.” It’s best to catch a wave just as it’s setting up, when there is enough incline to catch it, but before the wave goes concave. In the take-off, and really throughout the entire ride on the wave, the surfer, like the Zen student, must constantly find the middle way.

When opportunities present themselves, you’ll experience doubt. This is completely natural. Instead of fighting the doubt, let it be. If we embrace it, it tends to dissipate.

4. Embrace uncertainty 

There’s a moment on a wave known as “the drop.” It’s the moment when either our hopes are crushed or our hard work comes to fruition. It’s also the most uncertain moment of a wave. A wave’s shape is in constant flux and the surfer must adjust accordingly. But the shape also has a tendency to disappear or “close out,” meaning that a seemingly perfect wave can crumble into whitewater, leaving a surfer scrambling.

Nothing in life is guaranteed and living your life according to a predetermined formula is not a guarantee of success. You can’t predict your company will succeed, your art will fly off gallery walls, or your love will be returned. You have to embrace the uncertainty of it all and remember that the more waves you go for, the more you’ll catch.

5. Enjoy the bliss

Ask any surfer what it feels like to ride a wave and you’ll start to wonder if they’re talking about sex or surfing. The moment you stand up on your board something magical happens: fear, doubt and uncertainty dissolve, transforming into absolute happiness. Some researchers call this being “in the zone” or “in flow.”

Standing up on your board is the moment when your risk pays off. For the entrepreneur, it could be the day the company goes public or turns a profit. For the author, it could be the day the book gets published. Everything you went through to get there will seem worth it.

Ask any surfer what it feels like to ride a wave and you’ll start to wonder if they’re talking about sex or surfing.

6. Reflect on the choice

One of my friends once said that “surfing is the greatest natural high in the world.” Maybe it’s because it forces us to be truly present – there’s nothing else on our minds when riding a wave, both literally and figuratively. Catching that perfect wave can bring a peaceful calm to your life.

Once you know the consequences of your risk (whether good or bad), you’re overcome by a sense of calm. You’re no longer forced to confront a fear of the unknown. For the performer, it could be the standing ovation. For the entrepreneur, it could be knowing that the value created will result in job security for employees for years to come.

7. Do it all again 

After you catch that first wave and the adrenaline kicks in, all you can think about is catching the next one. You’re overcome by a sense of confidence that anything is possible. A surfer may call this being “stoked.” You realize what you’re capable of and become interested in continuing to defy your own limits.

There’s nothing else on our minds when riding a wave, both literally and figuratively.

It’s why entrepreneurs start multiple companies, authors write multiple books, and musicians produce multiple albums. There really is no moment when you’ve arrived. The journey is the destination and now you just have the confidence that becomes a part of who you are when you take the scenic route through life.

Talk to a surfer and he or she will tell you “all it takes is one good wave and you’ll be hooked.” The way you develop a tolerance for risk is by going for your wave.

The wipeouts of life and business are inevitable, but they’re never as bad as you think. It’s all just a part of surfing – and a part of living.

What do you think?

How do you approach risks you take in your life?

More insights on: Achievement, Failure, Risk-Taking

Srinivas Rao

more posts →
Srinivas Rao is the host of BlogcastFM, and the author of The Skool of Life where he writes about things you should have learned in school but never did. You can follow him on twitter @skooloflife
load comments (63)

Comments