Dvein: Evolving Imagination

Dvein is a motion and interactive studio based in Barcelona. As a multidisciplinary studio, the team provides art direction, design and animation services for cinema, broadcast media and the music industry. Behance sat down with the team to get the skinny on collaboration, making mistakes and getting the job done, at any cost.

Each project the team participates in has its own timeline, which they adapt to suit the client accordingly. “We have a schedule, a deadline and when we don’t have a deadline we try to reach a “satisfaction point…Frustration always comes when you feel you are not able to do something as well as you would like because the client isn’t communicating what they want, but you see it clearly. Our goal is also to push clients to assume some risks in their projects, try to evolve their point of view.”Dvein isn’t scared to push their creative limits; they use their successes and failures as learning experiences. “When you fail you should stand up and keep trying, so when an idea fails you should reset your mind and try to look for other possibilities that may work the same way. For us, making the Diesel Liquid Space Show was a big challenge as it was quite a new format not only for us, but for everybody. We tried to develop our ideas based on what it was representing, and the interaction between real and virtual. The holograms worked better in some situations and worked worse in others, so at the end we were happy about what we did, but we still want to push ourselves…”

Each creative has his own tips and tricks and we believe that those tips and tricks apply only to themselves.

Collaboration also allows the team to infuse their projects with fresh, new ideas and talent — something that is vital to any successful creative outfit. “It is always a rich experience to work with other people, and we are always open to it. For the TOCA ME opening titles and an upcoming project we have teamed up with Alex Trochut. His typographic view of design has given us a lot and we hope that the way we destroyed his creations gave him too a new point of view. We have lots of sources of inspiration, in each project we check books, and the internet searching for that texture, that animal, that light streak, that gives us the point we are looking for.”

Setting specific objectives and intents for each project allows Dvein’s creative process to run its full course. “We keep working to keep getting better and each project has its own goals, and those goals are our goals applied to the project. We may want to know how to work with stop motion, or we may want to make traditional animation or as with the TOCA ME opening titles, we would also like to play with wax and other materials – just because it is what seems most interesting for us in that specific moment.”

As far as organization and time management, the team believes that while you can learn from others, you need to actively create and maintain your own system for true productivity. “Each creative has his own tips and tricks and we believe that those tips and tricks apply only to themselves. That doesn’t mean that you can’t learn from other creatives, but once you have learned, you should develop your own ideal theory about the way you work better than just use other’s ideas.”

More insights on: Collaboration, Failure

Heather Ann Snodgrass

more posts →
Heather is the founder of Darling, where she makes amazing nail products for beautiful girls.
load comments (4)

Comments